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Harriet Elizabeth Beecher

Harriet Elizabeth Beecher[1, 2, 3]

Female 1811 - 1896  (85 years)

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  • Name Harriet Elizabeth Beecher 
    Born 14 Jun 1811  Litchfield, Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died 1 Jul 1896  Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Age 85 years 
    Buried 3 Jul 1896  Phillips Academy Cemetery, Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I539591  Tuszynski
    Last Modified 5 Jul 2018 

    Father Lyman Beecher,   b. 12 Oct 1775, New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jan 1863, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years) 
    Mother Roxana Ward Foote,   b. 10 Sep 1775, Guilford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Sep 1816, Litchfield, Litchfield, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 41 years) 
    Family ID F522517  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Sources 
    1. [S500007] Geni World Family Tree, (MyHeritage), https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-40000-5754052/harriet-elizabeth-stowe-born-beecher-in-geni-world-family-tree (Reliability: 3), 4 Oct 2017.
      Added via a Record Match

    2. [S500204] Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers, 1836-1922, (MyHeritage), https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10449-8432453/the-stark-county-democrat (Reliability: 4).

      The Stark County Democrat
      Publication: Canton, Stark, Ohio, USA
      Date: July 9 1896
      Text: "...of thousands of Republicans are rebelling against tho gold standard policy adopted by their party and endorsed by.its candidates on the National ticket. ' <span style="background-color: yellow; font-weight: bold; padding: 2px;">HARRIET</span> BEECIIKR STOW15. The death of <span style="background-color: yellow; font-weight: bold; padding: 2px;">Harriet</span> <span style="background-color: yellow; font-weight: bold; padding: 2px;">Beecher</span> ... , Russian and Welsh. Sho has now passed away at tho rlpo old ago of 84, but her life is crowned with many noble deeds and she will go down In history as ono of tho great women of the ago. The trouble ... . Kantz has commenced action against tho Supromo Tent of tho Knights of Maccabcos of tho World, to recover $1,000 alleged duo on tho death of hor husband, Simon P. Kantz, at Moadvlllo, Pa. Probate Court ... death, the undtvldtdono-tbtrd Interest In and to the rights, privileges and interests reserved to the lessor, John 11. Mlchener,..."
      About this sourceThe Stark County Democrat was established in 1833 using equipment acquired from a failed newspaper in Paris, Ohio. A man named Leonard purchased the printing equipment and supplies and founded the Democrat in nearby Canton. Within six months, Leonard died of cholera, and ownership of the paper was transferred to the editor, William Dunbar. Leonard’s death marked the first of the many managerial changes in the long history of the Democrat.Never shying away from its pointed commentary, the Democrat at first concentrated on local events, before shifting toward national headlines at the turn of the century. Yet from the outset, the paper also focused on larger issues. In fact, the Democrat was launched as a mouthpiece for those opposing the Bank of the United States and paper currency. During the Civil War, the Democrat aroused considerable opposition through its criticism of the national administration and the conduct of military operations. Local demonstrators nearly destroyed the plant in 1861, and the paper’s senior editor at the time, Archibald McGregor, was confined to Camp Mansfield, a military installation, for a month in 1862. McGregor was eventually discharged by Governor David Tod and took an oath of loyalty.The publication also documents the legal and political career of President William McKinley who moved to Canton in 1867 and served as the Stark County prosecuting attorney, United States Congressman, and Ohio governor before being elected as President of the United States in 1896. As a Democratic paper, it was not always supportive of McKinley’s Republican politics, such as the controversial McKinley Tariff of 1890 that caused him to lose his seat in Congress, but its reports did indicate that McKinley was, overall, well-liked by his fellow Cantonians and considered to be a man with “no stain” on his character.Beginning in 1888, the Democrat benefitted from the steady guidance of Civil War General and former Ohio Secretary of State and Representative Isaac R. Sherwood, who owned the Democratic Publishing Company. By that point, the paper was operating a cylinder press (established in 1866, the first in Stark County) and had cultivated a circulation of over 7,500. After General Sherwood retired, the Democrat changed hands several more times before it finally ceased publication in 1912



    3. [S500204] Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers, 1836-1922, (MyHeritage), https://www.myheritage.com/research/record-10449-10136629/the-mccook-tribune (Reliability: 4), July 10 1896.

      The McCook Tribune
      Publication: McCook, Red Willow, Nebraska, USA
      Date: July 10 1896
      Text: "...-day on the news of the death of <span style="background-color: yellow; font-weight: bold; padding: 2px;">Harriet</span> Bcecher <span style="background-color: yellow; font-weight: bold; padding: 2px;">Stowe</span> , said : "I am glad of it. Although there was some truth in what she wrote , there was much that was false. For instance , while it is true tnat there were ... in the interest of the Trans-Mississippi convention. Keep the ball rolling. William Breggaman , living south of Laurel , had a 10-year-old son instantly killed by being caught under a falling hay stacker. Buy home ... the beets back a little , but this hot weather is bringing them up again. Little Edith Boyd of Columbus is only 3 years old and had , the other day , a marvelous escape from death. A window in an ' upper ... of wood alcohol yesterday , and las' night bo' died from the ef fects. The dead men are Lewis Kennade , sentenced from St. Louis in..."
      About this sourceThe McCook Tribune served as a prominent news source for the Red Willow County seat of McCook, Nebraska, and much of its environs. J.P. Israel served as the Tribune’s publisher and editor under the paper’s original title, the McCook Weekly Tribune , which debuted on June 8, 1882, Just over a year later, on November 8, 1883, Frank M. Kimmel and E.M. Kimmel assumed ownership of the paper. On August 5, 1886, the Kimmels condensed the title to the McCook Tribune, although the paper continued as a weekly until 1924, when it shifted to a consistent triweekly schedule. The Tribune charged $2.00 annually regardless of publication schedule. While E.M. Kimmel helped run the paper in its earliest years, Frank Kimmel remained the primary editor and publisher until his death in 1928. The Tribune lasted only eight years after Kimmel’s passing. On June 20, 1936, rival editor Harry D. Strunk officially absorbed the Tribune into his McCook Daily Gazette. The Tribune maintained a five- column layout and ran approximately six to seven pages in early editions, later expanding to 10- to 16-page spreads. The Tribune’s masthead began as a simple bold text, later adopted calligraphic font, and in the end even featured a bubble-letter appearance. At times, it included the subheading “The Official City and County Paper” and “The Newsiest Paper in the [Republican River] Valley.” At first, advertisements encompassed much of the front page, leaving actual news to occupy interior pages.With a generally Republican agenda, the Tribune served as Frank Kimmel’s personal soapbox on political and economic affairs Kimmel used the paper to extol the virtues of morality and to help promote McCook and speed its progress towards civilization. The Tribune made a weekly ritual of analyzing the community and its problems and offering guidance for its improvement and well-being. The paper paid special attention to proceedings of the state legislature and Congress, railroad activities, education, and local social happenings. Kimmel proved an outspoken voice on regional issues, attacking gambling, prostitution, and alcohol and reprimanding lawmakers for neglecting the needs of western Nebraska. Frank Kimmel’s editorial voice rang clear throughout the Tribune, perhaps more so than many of his contemporaries who filled their pages with second-hand coverage of local and world events. While the Tribune certainly included samples of all such news, Kimmel’s contributions mainly took the form of first-person editorials, which earned him recognition as the “crusading editor” of southwest Nebraska and the “unofficial conscience” of McCook




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